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with stefan pedrazzi about whether he believes there are any reasons to be optimistic about greece. >>> and whether volatility triggered by uncertainty over the fiscal cliff should be hear to stay. the fiscal cliff seems to be here to stay, at least. house speaker john boehner has scrapped the deal on plan b. boehner conceded last night he didn't have enough support from republicans to pass the bill which would raise taxes on households making more than $1 is million a year. the house is now in recess until the end of the year. the white house says the president's main priority now is to ensure taxes goes go up for 98% of americans and 97% of small businesses. for more on the tax, we're joined. talk about the cliff. you wake up to the news this morning. what do you make of it? what do you do now? >> i guess what's happening is there is more idealogical battling going on in the republican party than maybe was obvious a little while ago. our baseline view is they will strike a deal either down to the wire or early next year. growth next year will be quite weak. it has to be said that
. but in the long run it's a healthier economy that doesn't go down the path of greece. if the long run greece would have low unemployment, but they do not, but yes, we're going to go a percent, if it happens the worse case scenario, but in five years we won't be not able to borrow money. >> brenda: julian, you can go ahead and respond. >> first of l, the ernst & young study has been debunked over and ov. and number two, the bush tax cuts, if you let the bh tax cuts. the crs study was a republican study and found the same thing as the cbo. if you let bush tax cuts expire on everybody, yes, you would have negative economic impact. the two staetudies done recentl shows the top two rates, top 2%, virtually no impact. to jonas' point if you raise taxes the lot and cut spending a lot and so austerity plan, that would have an impact. democrats were for pouring more money into the compli with stimulus and republicans wanted austerity and jonas' point is an argument against what conservatives were pushing for. >> brenda: all right. toby. >> what's the question? >> driving a smart car. >> and we did a survey
from becoming greece. no more borrowing without addressing why we're in debt to begin with. that's where the real chance for change occurs, at the debt ceiling debate. >> we're joined now by ralph sill voe. it's christmas eve. do you have some plans to do? >> it's an austerity christmas, actually. just a couple friends getting together and a couple of friends getting together and having a nice meal. >> it is not an austerity christmas. >> it actually is. we haven't had the greatest year. everything we hoped would happen. we thought this economy was going to turn around at the summer period. >> ralph, if you take a look at the stock market concerns, the dax is up 20%. >> there will be plenty of alcohol to forget. >> do you think we're going to manage to see some type of a resolution on the fiscal cliff? we're seeing a lot of finger pointing now and hearing from both sides saying it's in the other side's interest to delay these negotiations. >> i've had conversations with people in new york and working on trade floors. what i've been told by them is there is a huge number of meetin
. greece unveiling that $10 billion eurobond buyback. a 52-week high in france and germany. our road map this morning begins in washington where fiscal cliff negotiations according to the "times" has "collapsed." at least for now. with less than a month until the deadline, who blinks first if anyone? >> goldman takes dell from a strength to a buy. is it time to look at the stock and maybe even other players in the beat up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing data out of china. not bad. 50.6. that's the highest in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on
risk at the moment? we'll keep giving greece money because we can't afford not to. we're still waiting maybe for the ecb to step in. what is the till rask? anything we didn't know about? >> lots of things we don't know. that's the problem. it is the unknown unknown as they say. i think greece is probably too small to view. i think what really bothers me is spain which i think clearly bothers the whole market. the question, a growth going to fall off a cliff or whether it muddle through and a bailout will be sufficient. as you say, we don't know the answer to that question. that remains the tail risk. until we do get close to a resolution, i'm not going to turn massively bullish. >> what's your view on that? >> i think i go along very much with what he's saying. >> what is your view on what happens to spanish growth? >> i think spain has a lot of problems at the moment. it's not seeing a lot in the domestic market. not seeing it move toward an export. in which case spanish growth is going to be very, very weak for some time to come. >> all right. good to see you. thanks very much. alan
. there is no argument there as there wasn't for greece. we know the countries, italy, greece is in a crisis and it's a crisis due to lack of competitiveness. going back to the currency, under the currency they create a wave of all sorts of problems including inflation and i think it is not a good route. >> well, i do rather agree with paula on this one. the problem with the euro is it gives you easy and quick solutions. and we're going to keep developing your currency. as you go back to the old days where you keep lowering your currency and you pay relatively high rates on your debt. so the appeal of the euro in the beginning was, oh, chief debt. it looked like christmas. now we're discovering that that regime, a ten-year regime where many peripheral countries got hammered. only germany sort of really held it together. now we have to look at how to undo this. for countries who have no ambition about their future, then maybe the policy is the way to go. italy had so many things going for it that falling back, that seems almost -- >> how about the service in the g-7. >> italy is two countries. it's
ban them and it -- >> greg: the funny thing is we talk about greece, but before there was greece, there was detroit. detroit is greece. if it was only the acropolis. dead city. people left because they couldn't make a living, the unions suffocate pod tenial. >> bob: true about toledo and cleveland and cincinnati? the northern cities that have had bleed of workers? >> eric: i will make a wage with you. now that snyder signs it off and right to work, i bet an auto company goes -- brand new, never done business before in detroit. >> kimberly: you will lose this bet, bob. >> eric: coming up, 2004 south korean singer rapped about killing americans in 2019 and is invited to perform for president obama. ♪ ♪ >> eric: maybe not. we will gangmam bang it out next. and make sure you go to the facebook page. we are updating and posting facebook.com/thefivefnc. click like. we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ [ malennouncer ] it's tt time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you realldon't want to pay more than you have to. only
political crisis. >>> in greece, police fended off protesters launching molotov cocktails. >>> and in the u.s., the president is taking his fiscal cliff solutions directly to the people. >>> plus, a modern-day spy story ripped from the pages of a tom clancy novel. good morning, everyone. i'm lynn berry and we start with breaking news out of japan. a strong 7.3-magnitude earthquake has struck off the country's northeastern coast. that's the same region hit by last year's massive earthquake and tsunami. well, this morning's quake shook buildings as far as tokyo, and there are reports of a three-foot tsunami in the miyagi prefecture. the u.s. geological survey says there's no risk of a widespread tsunami, and so far, there have been no news of injuries or damage. of course, we're going to keep an eye on any aftershocks that occur and we'll bring you the very latest. >>> well, elsewhere, all eyes are on cairo this morning as turmoil has once again overtaken egypt's capital. this time, it's in response to a politically explosive power grab by the democracy's president, mohamed morsi. right now,
it from becoming greece. the game you're talking about is small ball. you're talking about raising the ceiling for 11 days. how about doing something big these not liberal. every idea is a liberal idea. how about manning up, mr. president and use your mandate to bring this country together to stop us from becoming greece. >> man up. with jim demint leaving, a new poll shows who they wants a his replacement. put your votes in. a very funny south carolinian. the one and only stephen colbert. the comedian miami tops the list. this is an honest poll. 20%. tim scott comes in second. colbert addressed the speculation around his potential candidacy on his show last night. >> there's already a twitter page, facebook, draft colbert website. i can tell you having done a show with him in charleston, he's an absolute rock star in that state. >> yes, i am a rock star in south carolina and not just because i ended my rally there with herman cain by biting the head off a dove. now, my network contract prohibits me from taking on another full-time job, so the sfl senate would be perfect. >>> south
from becoming greece but i'm not going to set aside the $1.2 trillion in cuts. any hope of going over the fiscal cliff must start in the senate. not one democrat would support the idea that we could protect 99% of americans from a tax increase. boehner's plan b i thought made sense. to my republican colleagues, the ronald reagan model is if you get 80% of what you want, that's a good day. we have the same objective of more taxes. i like simpson-bowles. eliminate deductions, more rates, put money on the debt. tax rate hikes are a partisan solution driven by the president. but he's going to get tax rate hikes. to my republican colleagues, if we can protect 99% of the public from a tax hike, that is not a tax increase in my book. chuck, maybe you and me and some other people in the senate can find a way to find this on the short term but on the long term there's not going to be a deal any time soon. >> you think we're going to go over the cliff? >> i think we're going to fall out of the fiscal tree. there will not be a big deal. the big chance at the big deal is at the debt ceiling. that
, the growing deficit on the path to greece, the goalets worse once we kick the can away. that will be the overriding probleming not the slowing economy not people spending money, but sure, that might not happen in the first two months, but it will eventually happen if we keep kicking down the can. we want to prove to the world that we have a solution and if it takes a few months to get there and higher taxes for a while, big deal, we will get there. that's got to be the plan not just the same nonsense. >> yeah, but larry, that's part of your point, but jonas says we're not in a bad recession, we're certainly not in a good recovery. and if we just keep falling little bit by little bit, maybe as much as jump off the cliff, but it's certainly a slippery slope. >> brenda, the damage is already being done. we saw it in november retail sales and companies delaying activity already and we know the ratings agencies are minutes away, we're right to fix the problem in the long run than making a bandaid short-term deal. it doesn't get recovery. >> we're going to g a bandaid deal an
fix the over spending that is going to turn us into greece and spain. you talk about it all the time, it is so important we do that. even if we don't get rean elected it is so important -- reelected it is so important we do that we need all the leverage we got. >> sean: we are on our way to 20 trillion in debt. this is beyond fiscal cliff, this is a fiscal dive into i don't want to think where it can take us. >> some would say, if the dollar were not the international currency, we would have already been greece. >> sean: i brought up some ideas at the tkpweuplg of the program. i said okay, why don't we go for 200 billion in discretionary cuts to start, yes to entitlement reform, you agree? yes to serious tax reform? >> do i ever. when the president says fair share the perfect answer, flat tax. he has not made one pro bowsal that will have warren buffett paying the same as his secretary. it is called capital gains 15%. income tax is 15%. you make more, you pay more. you make less, you pay less. everybody pays their fair share. >> sean: same with value added tax after eliminating the f
and that is a game leapfrog. we end up with more debt and a weaker economy. the road map is greece, italy, spain, all over europe but the president thinks you can tax-and-spend your way to prosperity. >>neil: what the administration throws back on the issue is take a look at italy and greece, austerity has worked. you say what? >>guest: they have a strange definition. alwaysst either to them means higher taxes in europe and the united states austerity means less spending. i am in favor of the right definition of austerity. the balkan countries got out of the mess and now they are doing well economically because they cut, not just cut spending in the washington sense of increasing it at a slower rate they spent less one year after the other and now they are out of the trouble. if you understand the right definition of austerity is the way to go, the problem is in most of europe it means higher taxes, obama wants to give us the bad part of europe, without the good part. >>neil: thank you very much. they are not cutting anything. just slowing the growth. rebound and former president bill clinton hitting
-- relation to gdp or never, we are not quite as bad as greece or portugal or never, but they are just talking about a few ring keating billions. a trillion word is really unique to the united states. and i think that is what is going to kill us, the absolute numbers. germany can afford to bailout greece. nobody can afford to bailout the united states, and i would agree actually with bill archer that i think he understated. if you take the total debt situation, you're talking about just shy of three-quarters of a million dollars for the -- per american family. so you get a cup of coffee from a waitress in the diner, think of loading three-quarters of a million dollars of debt on to her shoulders for what? for what? does nothing to show for. lou: her children and their children that will be paying a large measure of that. great to have you with us. making spirits bright. and after america with one of the ugliest pictures of an american cadaver toe tag to. >> doom and the oven is the into debt. lou: at least some balance here. you know how much are president loves balance. great to have you with
. because if there is ever going to be a change, if michigan will be saved and not become worse than greece, it will be because of the governor snider and the republicans. >> and the president went there jed and a made his public comments. these are his supporters. >> oh, yes. >> he appeals to the union workers. >> well, beyond him not condemning it, why is he supporting a system that has led to no jobs in that state? the state is bankrupt. it is detroit. you don't -- >> next question. is michigan a preview of coming attractions for america because of democratic policies? because that is the outcrop of what happened in michigan. >> we have a series of greeces around the country. and one piece of good news is probably the first state to go bankrupt is california. california is so left wing, they could never elect a republican governor. neither republicans or democrats have an incentive to bail it out so i don't think we will see a federal bailout. fortunately california will go first and probably not michigan. >> ann coulter, great to he sue. >> last show of the year. see you next year, sean
to the trading day. investors are waiting for the results of greece's bond buyback program occurs. joe has some of the big corporate news and this one is actually a global corporate story. >> hsbc. we're talking about paying $1.9 billion in the money lawnering lapses. a brirchb lender admitting to a breakdown of controls, in a statement announcing a deferred payment. yesterday standard chartered agreed to pay $27 million agreeing that it violates sanctions against iran and two other international companies. >> if you're an international bank and you prael without getting into this kind of trouble? >> no. >> can you actually operate without money laundering? >> i'm just saying, if you're going to be in business in all these types of markets, isn't this going to happen? >> aren't there sxwier countries that would be probably -- that it would stead if you don't want any business tale. >> was there a fascination in this country about whether you want to indict the whole institution or what happens systemically. >> is this your sequel? >> i was on the phone last night. one of the two publishers that
, greece, things are going pretty well in america. you would think it is a horrible obsession with the recession. we have a need to be scared. we always look out for the predator. but all the headlines sugges things are bad. >> what happened with avian flu? >> you might have gotten brain cancer from yourself loan. and it could have been is one of the most dangerous praises, art carden? >> yes. people ovestimate very, very small risk. the ada your child could be affected is what people worried about but if you were, he would never get to in the car again. the risk of driving a car is so much greater than a terrorist attack or ap did dollars -- obligee were driving into would year. john: it kill the 3,000. >> but then cost us $10 trillion and made of the world hates us now other issues are happening in the middle east. middle east. john: food for thoug how do traders using technical analysis streamline their process? at fidelity, we do it by merging two tools into one. combining your customized charts with leading-edge analysis tools from recognia so you can quickly spot key tre
for revenues, including tax rate hikes even though i do not like them to save the country from becoming greece. i will not set aside the $1.2 trillion in cuts. >> i know it is hard for republicans. the president ran on a platform. 250. he won 60% of the voters. peter: we will see what senator reid puts on the floor on thursday. we will see if it is something that some of these republicans can vote for, ashley, and see if that can avoid the fiscal cliff. the president and speaker both that they will cut their vacations short and return to washington this week to keep trying to work something out. ashley: i am surprised you got anyone would you made those calls today, peter. time is running out. peter barnes nbc. peter, thank you very much. ashley: a fox business exclusive. jeffrey, thank you so much for being here. you are bullish. >> there is an old market for a lot longer than i go back in this business. what we sell in mid-november, especially on the 16th and 19th, without getting too technical, we saw things like outside days and offside gaps. that was a key reversal. we also saw somewhat s
say we don't want to become like greece. what's driving off the fiscal cliff look like? it makes us look completely irresponsible as if we can't control our own spending and put in order some priorities. >> so some health care will be suffering? >> that's absolutely true. we want to incentive doctors ask hospitals to keep people well. not to just do procedures. and that's the key to really transforming medicare. >> i want to show you a map of the states that are refusing to implement the insurance exchanges. it's rather interesting. the other states are either implementing the exchanges or haven't decided to do that. if states don't decide to do it and the federal government comes in and sets up the exchange, isn't that kind of a win for the move towards universal health care because the infrastructure will be there? >> i think it provides people an option whether governors are refusing or not. that's the most important thing so they can get access to insurance products. also i think, you know, it takes away the claim that the federal government is u surping health care. states forf
return to europe for inspiration and guance for fisal policy, taking greece, perhaps, as a standard for dealing with economic and budget crises. the speaker did a charge the president is slow walking th nation to the brink of a fiscal cliff. that is one of the speakers firmest in the strongest statements yet. >> this is in a progress report because there is no progress to report. the white house has wated another week. there are a lot of things that are possible to put the revenue on the table, but none of it is going to be possible. the president insists on his position. insists on my way or the highway. lou: inconveniently the congressional budget office today reported that the federal deficit is already bulging. the cbo reports for the first two months of fiscal 2013 that number $2,902,00000,000, $57 billion more than the same two month time span last year. and the labor department today reported the unemployment rate fell to the 77%. good news, the lowest jobless rate in four years. the lower unemployment rate, however, the consequence of the more than 300,000 people who dropped
to happen in europe, and we don't know what's going to happen in greece and we don't know what's going to have in the euro zone and the energy needs in china and india and industrialized nations. what do you think is the biggest threat from the outside to the u.s. economy? >> the fiscal cliff. first of all i think there are issues that are beginning to improve and, you know, whether you look at the euro zone which is making progress, gradually, laboriously and certainly improving and with good numbers because if you look at thinge ia because if you look at thinge a greg gat euro zone debt, and you have political stability back now that the new team is in place so the volatility and the instability factors that are outside have reduced. the real threat that we have at the moment is really here with us and that can be addressed. >> but when you look at, i mean i understood that the european banks had sort of downsized or downgraded what they thought would be growth. you've got more than 11% unemployment in the euro zone, which is a good deal higher than here. >> yeah yeah. >> are those
the stand outout here is the euro. greece getting a five notch upgrade at the s&p. our road map this morning starts with gm. government motors no more. the treasury to exit its stake in the next 12 to 18 months, purchasing 2 million shares by the end of this month. >> another challenging quarter for fedex with the blame squarely on sandy. but the stock is up pre-market. >> oracle posts a strong quarter with even stronger guidance. the season rebound in europe. no impact from the fiscal cliff. >> and ge gets boosted from ubs's key call list on the weaker than expected macro environment. still on the list is including -- well tell you in a couple of minutes. >> general motors is up sharply in the pre-market session. the treasury department says it intends to sell the rest of its stakes in gm in the next 12 to 15 months. the automaker will buy back 200 million shares from treasury for $27.50 a share. treasury says it plans to sell its other remaining shares through various means in an orderly fashion. timothy masssad will join us later. this could be a buy signal with the government signaling i
it a recession with 25 percent unemployment in spain, greece. things are getting worse everywhere. the austerity measures, what austerity measures? i got one. make a story. i'll make a bad bet. i don't want to take my losses. of take the money from you, mr. citizen. of tax you more, cat your services. what you do did you will pay more for my note that your pension and benefits. tom: how does all this in? we wind up with pitchforks? >> it's happening now. they don't call it class warfare. that is what is going on over there. again, there is no air spring. there's nothing about a pro-democracy movement. far too few had much too much and way too many head was too little. the people in the street that one piece of the pipe command it's going on around the world. and for some reason people are oblivious to it. look in this country, college graduates, the income is declining eight or 10% since the recession. you can't find a job. 3 percent of them have jobs paying high-school wages. so you're right. it's not getting better, and again, we have the incompetence in washington making things worse. tom: bu
is betting against the euro. the fact that it's a, greece exiting the eurozone is going to drag down the euro with it. i don't think that's the way you want to play that this coming year. the euro is supported by trade and investment flows, they keep it on an even keel. where you want to focus are on those currencies that have an interest rate advantage, you focus on those currencies that have export-led growth, particularly those that are linked to commodities. i like the canadian dollar for 2013, and the emerging market space i also like the south african rand, a large producer, of course, of precious metals. liz: okay, north of the border, i get that, but you're looking at a south african rand where there is a gyrating political climate sometimes there. you have strikes at the very metal mines and natural resource mines that people talk about. why do you feel that that's sort of a play that people might be at least considering? >> well, i think that as the u.s. dollar we cannens on improving -- weakens on improving conditions this year, that helps to buoy commodity prices, okay? that is go
and greece are also reported to want out. >> it costs to perform, and it costs to stage it. and what do you get back? bluntly a bunch of hoopla and a few pom-poms. it can be uplifting when the times are good. greece won it in 2005, but is it appropriate for the greeks to pump millions or billions in? i think austerity is one reason. but i think also the tone is another. is it right to be celebrating in spandex when your people are out on the streets? >> reporter: looking at some of the countries' economic scorecards, it's hardly surprising. greece is aware that taking part could be an issue. especially as its economy is expected to drop to minus 4.5% next year. portugal, meanwhile, is expected to shrink 1.8%. and poland and slovakia have decided to spend their money on other projects. that's despite projecting positive growth for 2013. ♪ it reportedly costs around $160,000 to take part. and if you win, some countries spend big to host the lavish event. for some national broadcasters, this is reason enough to pull out. >> the cost of staging has been mounting in recent years. russia put on
think about it, we don't want to go bankrupt. we don't want to be like greece. entitlement reforms, the majority of our spending, and also to make sure that those programs are preserved 2024 medicare is insolvent. social security 2033. it is time for us to come together and solve the big problems. >> do you think entitlements have to be on the table? >> putting revenue on the table versus specificity is really two different things. as a business guy, you got to have a term sheet with details. if the republican leadership -- >> senator mcconnell said, hey, you know what, let's raise the -- >> the president doesn't like the details in the term sheet that secretary geithner laid out, then come up with a counter term sheet. we've got to get past the kind of washington decoder speak and say specifically how do we get there? i also believe that one of the things we need to get to is major tax reform, but we need to go ahead and lay down what we're going to get layout what we do before the end of the year, and then how we get to that -- i believe at least $4 trillion in deductions. >> i h
there is going to be physical, you think greece is bad wait until you see what happens here. that could very well happen in this country. am i wrong? >> not at all. it's not going to happen overnight. clearly at some point and we know when that point is 90%, 100% of ratio debt to g.d.p. we are already under obama divent to g.d.p. the ratio of debt to g.d.p. was 44%. it's now about 73%. that's in four years. that's astronomical. >> he sees the same stats that you see, that i see. he knows it. he knows what he is doing. yet, when you present this to the democratic party or even to the american people who by the way voted for this the american people voted for. this barack obama made no campaign promises that he would cut spending, none. he didn't say he would reign in government, none. yet the american people said you know what? that's okay with us. you keep spending, you keep getting it up there and we will take our chances. do you think most americans understand this? >> not at all. and i think it's pretty easy to win elections when you give away candy that you borrow from the chinese. and i thin
your retirement, have brought us to the brink of becoming greece, the people that are stealing from their children and breaking open their piggy banks, how can they call people who pay half of the taxes greedy? they're the ones that are agreey, they're the ones that are selfish, and they're the ones that have spent beyond their means. you rarely hear that. why is that? the left controls most media outlets in the country and they define compassion and generosity by spending other people's money. this is a selfish, massive power grab and this is done by greedy politicians, you know, the ones that claim they care about you as they crat -- as they create d see, there are 18 mor million me americans on food stamps. 50 million americans in total on food stampletion. one in six americans live in poverty, millions more living paycheck to paycheck. i suspect with all the government compassion, i believe people would rather live debt-free. there's a lot of good time spending their money and then blaming the people who are giving them the money. if we're going to save america, we've got to rec
or any american congress borrow anymore more money until we fix this country from becoming greece. and that requires significant entitlement reform. >> meanwhile, president obama and house speaker john boehner met sunday at the white house. the spokespeople for both men said they agreed not to release details or characterize the meeting. it was their first one-on-one meeting in 18 months as boehner spokesman michael steele says he is still waiting on a counteroffer from the president to last week's republican offer. in michigan today president obama said the house just needs to pass the bill already passed by the senate. >> congress lets middle class taxes go up, economists will tell you that means people will spend nearly $200 billion less than they otherwise would spend. consumer spending is going to go down. all congress needs to do is pass a law that would prevent a tax hike on the first $250,000 of everybody's income. >> president obama still has the american people firmly on his side. this is what the republicans don't get, apparently. 60% support raising taxes on households
. >> did you see the s&p upgraded greece today by six notches? i had to hit the machine to make sure that was the correct number there. >> well, you know, a lot of volatility in rate. >> bob pisani, what do you think today? a pretty good real under way? all about the fiscal cliff? >> well, the markets, is bullish because the markets are acting like 2013 will resolve a lot of problems so we've multi-month highs in the stock market. we have the safe haven, gold and bonds just getting hit badly again. i mean, bond yields are moving up. gold is moving down on a day when the dollar is -- is weak today, so the markets are sort of acting like things are actually going to resolve themself. even now, maria, you might notice, the headlines out this afternoon aren't bullish. markets believe a deal is coming quickly. >> so do you guys. you don't have any necessarily different guidance or expectation or reports than we do, and you both are very much in step that a deal gets done what. if it doesn't? >> i kind of think what's going on right now is a little dance. everybody has to appeal to their c
are talking about. >> the real cliff is america has become a greece. thank you both. >> happy new year's, guy. >> good to see you both. coming up, what exactly is going to happen if we go over the so-called fiscal cliff. what happens to your wallet. we will detail the five ways this is going to impact your family, your wallet and your finances. and also new york governor an drew cuomo is ready for a fight over gun control. he's even talking about confiscating weapons. how far is he going to go? all of that and more later. and sam donaldson tells tea party america this is not your country anymore. with the spark cash card from capital one, olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] olaf's small busins earns 2% cash back on every purchase, ery day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great businesses deserve great rewards! awesome!!! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? smoke? nah, i'm good.
't going pay its debts. we are going to be like greece. that was -- everybody -- both sides, by the way, republicans and democrats, both used the phrase default. you know perfectly well how it works in the government. you can make choices. >> i hate to break the news to you but -- i don't think anyone other than watching cnbc anyone actually cares and nobody believes the federal government will not pay social security or other debts. >> are you kidding me? i think they do. that's what they start with. right? start with the social security checks aren't going to go out. then -- what do people do, call their congressmen? the elderly get frightened. they think they won't have their weekly paychecks. >> this would not be the first time anyone from the executive branch tried to scare senior sit sense what do we do? we are going over the cliff. do you think we are going over cliff? >> i talked to the speaker's people today. bottom line is the speaker did remarkably smart. he didn't bring his bill up because he didn't have the votes and then sent every one of his members home so they could not
but will be a downward slide to make us like greece. no lodnger a viable economic power. >> hang on. we'll continue this. we have to take a quick break. the fiscal cliff has the president sounding like new york yankees legend yoeg gi ber ra. >> this is deja shz vu all over again. americans want to know why you can't get stuff down in an organized timetable. >> so if we all saw it coming, why did congress wait so long to do something about it? why do toys for tots and hasbro trust duracell to power their donated toys? duralock power preserve. it locks in power for up to 10 years in storage. guaranteed. duracell with duralock. trusted everywhere. anyone have occasional constipation, diarrhea, gas, bloating? yeah. one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against these digestive issues with three strains of good bacteria. approved! [ female announcer ] live the regular life. phillips'. >>> we are back. let me just go back to one point, and that is there are people sitting around wondering whether their taxes will go up. i want to ask you again about the chances of you think of somethin
broke. we'll go the way of greece, and the president hasn't moved off that. he's still playing politics with these issues, and frankly i think most of us now don't care who gets the blame. we're concerned about our economy and about our paychecks. >> richard, senate minority leader mitch mcconnell took to the senate floor this afternoon and said despite the setback all is not loss. >> there's no situation that remains an impossible sticking point. the sticking point appears to be a willingness and interest or frankly the courage to close the deal. i want everyone to know i'm willing to get this done. but i need a dance partner. >> you know, so richard, here we are talking about this blame game, and everybody is pointing their fingers at one another as we've been hearing all afternoon. what do you think that republicans are looking for here? >> i heard the same "meet the press" interview that terry did. i didn't hear the president casting blame. what i heard was the president talking the ways in which he's gone more than halfway to the republicans' position on taxes, on spending. i think
towards greece and european decline. we all know and both parties recognize a resolution to medicare liabilities has to be part of a solution. >> give me one idea you would be ready to sign onto today that would significantly reduce medicare spending. >> we've already passed such a solution in the house. last year we passed legislation that would reform medicare. the budget paul ryan, chairman of the budget committee put forward, passed it to the house, senate hasn't passed a bunl in 1,000 days. we weren't able to get them engaged on that topic. that proposal able to bend the cost curve in medicare, put us toward the budget and preserve medicare exactly the way it is for current retirees. that's the balance you have to strike. that legislation struck a balance of 55 and above keeping medicare exactly the way it is and making changes for those in their 20s and 30s and 40s. most people i talk to in those groups understand we've got to reform medicare to save it and balance the federal budget. >> congressman, good luck to you. hopefully we'll see you on the other side of a deal. sue. >>
seeing signs of stress again with the concerns about leadership in italy, and problems in greece, and should we pay attention to that than the fiscal cliff discussions? >> well, you know, right now, doesn't seem like the market is paying attention to that right now. it reminds me a lot of september, before the election, when the s&p's rallied. everything was con taped. we were worried about central bank, liquidity, numbers okayed here, heating up in china. people thought europe was contained, and it feels that way now. people looking past the headlines whether it's the fiscal cliff or europe. i mean, there's a lot of doom day sayers out there, and it makes sense, but it seems like everything right now is contained, and the trade is up to the upside. david: right. liz mentioned the fed decision coming up, should be hearing about it tomorrow. what's the market expecting from the fed? in what way will they be excited or disappointed? >> well, i think the market, if you look at the options market, the flows into the ten year treasuries, it's implying 85 billion per month. the reason
it was dubai and bp oil spill or greece or spain or the deleveraging or foreclosures. any of these things that we're supposed to take us out and yet we keep moving. i think the fiscal cliff is another one of these. >> let me ask you about the timing then. deutsche bank had a note out yesterday where they suggested that central banks have bought us a six months of time on the markets. if pmis do not improve, will we see growth? what would you say to that view? >> i mean, i'm pretty simple on this. i do not believe and we could debate this probably all day that quantitative easing itself has helped the economy at all. banks put that money right back to the fed as excess reserves. it hasn't boosted money in the economy. i don't believe that we've seen a false rally or sugar high. i think the growth in the economy and growth in the markets has been driven by productivity and profits. i think it's real. it's slow. it's real. we're going to have a weak fourth quarter. i believe most of that weakness is because of sandy. we're going to pick up later in the quarter. we'll have 2.5% to 3% growth n
. google is flying from south to north. so i think they're kind of mingling right now in greece. so in santorini. this is his dashboard. you can see where he is. there's a lot of games. kids having a ball with it. it shows you where santa is. he's leaving his presence as he moves. he's moving from africa north. so now they kind of just bypassed each other in greece. and now google is now in finland where the other guy is. or similar santa was earlier. they're kind of meeting in the middle. just around the equator. >> here's the thing, we just don't want a midair santa crash. that would be the worst case scenario. thank you so much, alexandria, in an age of e-mails and tweets, here we go. it's nice to know that a letter can still be a powerful tool. it also helps if you have a powerful role model. that would be 9-year-old gabriella miller. she got strangers from around the world to write letters to santa. that out pouring will bring some joy for severely ill children like gabriella herself. now, our affiliate has the story. >> we have a mountain of letters here. >> reporter: chris' c
like greece, spain and italy have been tackling their problems with sharp cuts in spending and higher taxes and that's been fueling recession and unrest. meanwhile, we now know that japan officially slipped into its own recession over the summer with the japanese economy contracting 3.5% between july and september. now, the previous quarter, the previous three months number was also revised lower and that makes for two consecutive quarters of negative growth and that's the classic definition of a recession. from asia, back to america, literally, a group of chinese investors agreed today to buy an 80% stake in aig's aircraft leasing business. back in 2008, the insurance giant was bailed out by the u.s. government to the tune of $180 billion. four years on, still paying back the money by selling off assets including the aircraft leasing unit that complemented aig's airplane insurance business. if u.s. regulators apro s appro deal, it will be one of the largest ever by chinese investors. china's state owned oil giant c-nook swooped in to acquire nexen for a cool $15 billion. note to the
farm in maine that helps turn greece into finding peace. >> i know when chris died, we kept thinking about how we were going to remember him. and we kept thinking that his spirit was moving through the trees every time you saw them moving. i seem to be drawn to maine even though i've never lived here. it's pretty amazing. >> we're in the wreath business and have been since 1971. columbia falls is a little town in coastal washington county. the perfect little country town kind of thing. we're looking for 12 to 18-inch pieces. as fast as this brush is coming in, we're using it on the other end. we're out on the land that produces the tips for national wreaths across america day. >> each wreath is made of balsam that is picked off of our own land. it began as a family tradition to donate 5,000 wreaths to arlington national cemetery. >> a great source of pride for my family. it's our little way of giving back to the country is through the veterans wreaths program and the new veterans remembers trees program. >> that's captain brent morale, u.s. marine corps. this is another tree has been
rate increases, maybe not at 250, but upper rate americans. we accomplished little in not become greece. this won't affect the debt situation. it will be a political victory for the president and i hope we have the courage of what we believe is republicans. hats off to the president, he won. >> reporter: democrats would acknowledge this deal, if there is a deal is smaller in scope and won't do as much for reducing the deficit long term as both sides hoped. the real focus is to focus the most harm on people. not having everyone's taxes going up. there's a lot more involved in it. we have been focused on taxes. we hope to have something that gives a sense of are they close? will they get there? within a couple hours. >> a couple hours. we'll check in with you again. thank you so much. i want to bring in a fiscal policy reporter, laura montgomery as well as political writer for "the new york times," john harwood. you heard kelly mention some republicans weren't feeling the president's interview on "meet the press" this morning. they took issue with it. from that interview and what you saw
in europe, greece was the problem child that spent too much, saved nothing and threatened to take down the euro. new leadership, pay cuts, higher taxes as their weary government begs for more cash. committing to save the euro. it lives on, but for how long? >> the deadliest month to date as the assad regime intensified its air power. >> how much longer can this man hold on to power? bashar al assad was under even more intense pressure to step down but his regime stepped up the fire power against the opposition, civilians caught in the crossfire, more than 40,000 people have died so far. >> reporter: this is yet another bread line. >> the opposition fights on, making more dramatic gains than ever and gaining pledges of support from the international community. number one, she fought back from the brink of death after being attacked on a school bus. the taliban shot malala yousafzai. she survived, wake up in a british hospital and, according to her father, immediately asked for her school books. the world was gripped, moved and inspired by the story of one determined young girl facing do
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